Dolpo Crystal Mountain

Inner (Upper) Dolpo
The mystique of remote Inner Dolpo, closed to foreigners for decades and still culturally Tibetan, has been enhanced by Matheissen's 'The Snow Leopard', David Snellgrove's 'Himalayan Pilgrimage' and George Schaller's 'Stones of Silence' among many other travel accounts. Legend has it that the ubiquitous Guru Rimpoche, who spread Tibetan Buddhism throughout the Himalayas, discovered this hidden land, a 'beyul' or refuge, over 1700 years ago, and it has been inhabited by Tibetan nomads, called drokpas, for over a thousand years.
Dolpo is now part of the Nepali region of Dolpa, but historically came from the Zhangzhung Bon-po Kingdom which dominated Western Tibet for over a thousand years, later defeated by the first Tibetan dynasty, Yarlung, between the sixth and eighth centuries. Afterwards, Dolpo was governed by the Kingdom of Lo (now Mustang, formerly part of Tibet) until the Gorkha Kingdom took it over during its consolidation of Nepal a century and a half ago. Since then, it has remained isolated, partly due to its remote location, and partly because of the Khampa guerillas using Mustang and Dolpo as a base during their fight against the Chinese occupation of Tibet after 1959. It has only been open for trekking and tourism since 1989, and then only parts of southern Dolpo were opened. There is still a special restricted area permit needed to trek above Phoksumdo Lake in Shey Phoksumdo National Park, which has only been a viable trekking region since 1999 because of the Maoist activities in this region. This is Nepal's largest national park. Inner Dolpo has a population of approximately 5000 inhabitants, many of whom head south for the winter, and is home to some of the highest villages on the planet.
Every twelve years there is a special festival attended by all the Dolpa-pa in Shey Gompa. The program starts from August 25th and ends on September 1rst. There will be traditional dances, drinking, singing, horse competition, archery competition.
Inner (Upper) DolpoThe mystique of remote Inner Dolpo, closed to foreigners for decades and still culturally Tibetan, has been enhanced by Matheissen's 'The Snow Leopard', David Snellgrove's 'Himalayan Pilgrimage' and George Schaller's 'Stones of Silence'
Inner (Upper) DolpoThe mystique of remote Inner Dolpo, closed to foreigners for decades and still culturally Tibetan, has been enhanced by Matheissen's 'The Snow Leopard', David Snellgrove's 'Himalayan Pilgrimage' and George Schaller's 'Stones of Silence' among many other travel accounts. Legend has it that the ubiquitous Guru Rimpoche, who spread Tibetan Buddhism throughout the Himalayas, discovered this hidden land, a 'beyul' or refuge, over 1700 years ago, and it has been inhabited by Tibetan nomads, called drokpas, for over a thousand years.Dolpo is now part of the Nepali region of Dolpa, but historically came from the Zhangzhung Bon-po Kingdom which dominated Western Tibet for over a thousand years, later defeated by the first Tibetan dynasty, Yarlung, between the sixth and eighth centuries. Afterwards, Dolpo was governed by the Kingdom of Lo (now Mustang, formerly part of Tibet) until the Gorkha Kingdom took it over during its consolidation of Nepal a century and a half ago. Since then, it has remained isolated, partly due to its remote location, and partly because of the Khampa guerillas using Mustang and Dolpo as a base during their fight against the Chinese occupation of Tibet after 1959. It has only been open for trekking and tourism since 1989, and then only parts of southern Dolpo were opened. There is still a special restricted area permit needed to trek above Phoksumdo Lake in Shey Phoksumdo National Park, which has only been a viable trekking region since 1999 because of the Maoist activities in this region. This is Nepal's largest national park. Inner Dolpo has a population of approximately 5000 inhabitants, many of whom head south for the winter, and is home to some of the highest villages on the planet.Every twelve years there is a special festival attended by all the Dolpa-pa in Shey Gompa. The program starts from August 25th and ends on September 1rst. There will be traditional dances, drinking, singing, horse competition, archery competition.

Trip Itinerary

Itinerary at a glance

Day 1: arrive Kathmandu;

Day 2: fly to Nepalgunj ;

Day 3: fly to Juphal, hike to Dunai;

Day 4-27 trek up to upper Dolpo and back to Juphal;

Day 28: fly to Kathmandu;

Day 29: Kathmandu;

Day 30: depart Kathmandu


Contact Us

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Tel: 977 1 4006687 / 4006689
Fax: 977 1 4006686
E-mail: yeti@yetiadventure.com